Seattle Mariners go to bat against cancer

Seattle Mariners go to bat against cancer

Seattle Mariners go to bat against cancer

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by JANET KIM / KING 5 News

NWCN.com

Posted on May 11, 2014 at 6:45 PM

Seattle, Wash. -- On this Mother's Day, Safeco Field was full of moms and their children cheering on the Mariners. The game wasn't just about baseball, but the theme was "Going to Bat Against Cancer." 

Well before the first pitch at Safeco Field, Mariners fans flooded the stands with blue and green. On this mother's day, the field also saw splashes of pink. It's a color that doesn't just celebrate moms, but breast cancer survivors like Donna Person-Smith.

"Major League Baseball selected me as the honorary Bat Girl for Mother's Day," said Person-Smith.

Bat Girl means Donna threw the first pitch. Her opponent though isn't the other team, it's been cancer.

"When you are told you have cancer, it is just a punch in the gut," said Person-Smith.

A punch she got twice, when her mother Carla Person was diagnosed with breast cancer too. 

"I sort of felt like I took one for the team, so why did my mom have to have it too?" she asked.

The two of them now make a team that beat cancer together.

"She's good and I'm good and we're very blessed," said Carla Person.

Before Donna Person-Smith took the mound, Mariners Pitcher Taijuan Walker offered his support. He doesn'et just know baseball, but also what it means to be a cancer survivor. His own mother is one.

"It's always a great feeling when you can meet another breast cancer survivor,because you know what they've been through and gone through  to beat it," said Walker.

A battle that has now brought Donna and her mom to the game of their lives.

"This is something I didn't think in a million years that I would be throwing out the first pitch at a major league baseball game," said Person-Smith. 

Donna and her mother Carla said early detection saved their lives. It's one of the messages they wanted to drive home at the game. 

The American Cancer Society notes cancer found during screening exams are more likely to be smaller in size and can save thousands of lives each year.
 



 

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