Neighbors meet with police over kids with gun

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by KGW Staff

NWCN.com

Posted on December 11, 2012 at 10:24 AM

Updated Tuesday, Dec 11 at 1:22 PM

PORTLAND -- Portland police officers met Monday night with neighbors concerned about the 11-year-old and 7-year-old boys accused of trying to rob a woman with a loaded gun and then returned to their parents' custody.

Ami Garrett, 22, said she was sitting in her truck last Saturday when the 11-year-old and a 7-year-old boys approached her in a church parking lot and tried to carjack her while she waited for her parents, according to Sgt. Pete Simpson with the Portland Police Bureau.

Garrett told officers that the 7-year-old told the 11-year-old to "show her your piece" and the 11-year-old lifted his shirt and showed her the gun.

"They told me they were going to blow my brains out if I didn't give them something," she said.

Garrett managed to get away safely and alerted police, who soon found the boys nearby.

Simpson said the juvenile justice center was not set up to handle such young kids, so officers took them home to their parents, who live in the Centennial community.

More: Young boys accused of attempted armed robbery

Members of that community association held a meeting Monday night over concerns that the boy and his 7-year-old accused accomplice will get into more trouble if authorities don't intervene.

Ron Clemson, who lives in the area, said the 11-year-old is a known troublemaker in the community and he needs help.

"There's a lot of concerned folks in the neighborhood and we just want to see a good outcome to this," Clemson said.

Lt. Frank Gorgoni told residents there's an extra patrol in the neighborhood now and they should call police if there are any problems.

Other neighbors said the 11-year-old is responsible for past threats and rock-throwing vandalism in the area.

The boy's father said his son has been running with the wrong crowd and he's trying to get him on the right path.

Typically, kids under the age of 12 cannot be placed in juvenile detention, unless a judge decides it is in the best interest of the child.

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