Cardinals hold final talks amid debate over manager or pastoral pope

Print
Email
|

Associated Press

Posted on March 11, 2013 at 5:34 PM

VATICAN CITY (AP) — On the eve of their conclave to elect the next pope, Roman Catholic cardinals are offering widely differing views of what they want in a pope.

Cardinals held their final closed-door debate today over whether the church needs more of a manager to clean up the Vatican's bureaucratic mess or a pastor to inspire the 1.2 billion faithful in times of crisis. Not all cardinals had a chance to speak, suggesting there's still unfinished business going into the first round of voting.

There is no clear front-runner and no sense that a single man has what it takes to fix the church's many problems.

However, speculation has begun to focus on Italian Cardinal Angelo Scola and Brazilian Cardinal Odilo Scherer. Scola is as favored by cardinals hoping to shake up the Vatican bureaucracy. Scherer is a favorite of Vatican-based insiders who want to maintain the status quo.

Cardinals enter the Sistine Chapel on Tuesday, and there's no indication how long voting will last.

%@AP Links

233-c-19-(Mark Smith, AP correspondent)-"penalty of excommunication"-AP correspondent Mark Smith reports one of the final rites has taken place before tomorrow's Vatican conclave -- swearing the staff to secrecy. (11 Mar 2013)

<<CUT *233 (03/11/13)>> 00:19 "penalty of excommunication"

235-v-33-(Steve Coleman, AP religion editor)--The conclave to elect a successor to the retired Pope Benedict XVI could take, hours, days or months. AP Religion Editor Steve Coleman reports the only certainty is that it will continue until two-thirds of the voting cardinals agree. (11 Mar 2013)

<<CUT *235 (03/11/13)>> 00:33

234-c-21-(Mark Smith, AP correspondent)-"will go longer"-AP correspondent Mark Smith reports there are fresh signs the conclave could be lengthy. (11 Mar 2013)

<<CUT *234 (03/11/13)>> 00:21 "will go longer"

249-a-09-(Cardinal Wilfrid Napier, from Duban, South Africa, with reporters)-"into, into things"-Cardinal Wilfrid Napier says the fact that not everyone got a chance to speak at the final closed-door debate prior to the conclave shows there is still unfinished business going into the first round of voting for a new pope. (11 Mar 2013)

<<CUT *249 (03/11/13)>> 00:09 "into, into things"

189-a-14-(Cardinal Wilfrid Napier, Archbishop of Durban, South Africa, speaking to reporters after final pre-conclave meeting)-"in different parts"-South Africa Cardinal Wilfrid Napier says the cardinals were determined to have a thorough discussion to discuss what the new pope will face. (11 Mar 2013)

<<CUT *189 (03/11/13)>> 00:14 "in different parts"

188-a-09-(Cardinal Wilfrid Napier, Archbishop of Durban, South Africa, speaking to reporters after final pre-conclave meeting)-"get into things"-South Africa Cardinal Wilfrid Napier says he and the other cardinals have tried to take their time in preparing for tomorrow's conclave. (11 Mar 2013)

<<CUT *188 (03/11/13)>> 00:09 "get into things"

APPHOTO EM112: A nun walks inside St. Peter's Square, at the Vatican, Monday, March 11, 2013. Cardinals have gathered for their final day of talks before the conclave to elect the next pope amid debate over whether the Catholic Church needs a manager pope to clean up the Vatican's messy bureaucracy or a pastoral pope who can inspire the faithful and make Catholicism relevant again. (AP Photo/Emilio Morenatti) (11 Mar 2013)

<<APPHOTO EM112 (03/11/13)>>

APPHOTO VAT102: A statue dwarfs the chimney on the roof of the Sistine Chapel where cardinals will gather to elect the new pope during the conclave at the Vatican, Monday, March 11, 2013. (AP Photo/Dmitry Lovetsky) (11 Mar 2013)

<<APPHOTO VAT102 (03/11/13)>>

APPHOTO EM109: St. Peter's Basilica is seen as people walk outside St. Peter's Square, at the Vatican, Monday, March 11, 2013. Cardinals have gathered for their final day of talks before the conclave to elect the next pope amid debate over whether the Catholic Church needs a manager pope to clean up the Vatican's messy bureaucracy or a pastoral pope who can inspire the faithful and make Catholicism relevant again. (AP Photo/Emilio Morenatti) (11 Mar 2013)

<<APPHOTO EM109 (03/11/13)>>

Print
Email
|