Power of Moore tornado dwarfs Hiroshima bomb

Power of Moore tornado dwarfs Hiroshima bomb

Credit: Getty Images

MOORE, OK - MAY 21: Piles of debris and cars lie around a home destroyed by a tornado May 21, 2013 in Moore, Oklahoma. The town reported a tornado of at least EF4 strength and two miles wide that touched down yesterday killing at least 24 people and leveling everything in its path. U.S. President Barack Obama promised federal aid to supplement state and local recovery efforts. (Photo by Brett Deering/Getty Images)

Print
Email
|

by ASSOCIATED PRESS

NWCN.com

Posted on May 21, 2013 at 12:33 PM

MOORE, Okla. -- Wind, humidity and rainfall combined precisely to create the massive killer tornado in Moore, Okla. And when they did, the awesome amount of energy released over that city dwarfed the power of the atomic bomb that leveled Hiroshima.
 
Meteorologists contacted by The Associated Press used real time measurements to calculate the energy released during the storm's life span of almost an hour. Their estimates ranged from 8 times to more than 600 times the power of the Hiroshima bomb.
 
Scientists know the key ingredients that go into a devastating tornado. But they are struggling to figure out why they develop in some big storms and not others. They also are still trying to determine what effects, if any, global warming has on tornadoes.

The state medical examiner’s office has revised the death toll from a tornado in an Oklahoma city suburb to 24 people, including seven children.

Spokeswoman Amy Elliot said Tuesday morning that she believes some victims were counted twice in the early chaos of the storm. Authorities said initially that as many as 51 people were dead, including 20 children.

Teams are continuing to search the rubble in Moore, 10 miles south of Oklahoma City, after the Monday afternoon tornado.

Hospital officials say they've treated hundreds of patients, including dozens of children, since a tornado hit an Oklahoma City suburb.
 
About 60 patients remained hospitalized Tuesday following Monday's tornado.
 
Norman Regional Hospital spokeswoman Melissa Herron says 20 of the more than 100 patients her hospital treated remain hospitalized.
 
Spokeswoman Brooke Cayot says about 20 of the 90 patients seen at Integris Southwest Medical Center also remain in the hospital.
 
OU Medical Center spokesman Scott Coppenbarger says his hospital has treated 93 people, including 59 children. Twenty remained hospitalized Tuesday, including four adults who were treated after Sunday's storms.
 
St. Anthony Hospital spokeswoman Sandra Payne says her hospital and affiliated facilities have seen 36 patients, including 14 children. Three children were transferred elsewhere. All other patients there were being released.

Print
Email
|