Jewish Federation survivor: 'This can't be happening'

Jewish Federation survivor: 'This can't be happening'

Credit: KING

Accused Seattle Jewish Federation shooter Naveed Haq arrives in court for his trial on Thursday, Oct. 22, 2009.

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by KYLE MOORE / KING 5 News

NWCN.com

Posted on October 22, 2009 at 12:36 PM

Updated Thursday, Oct 22 at 4:10 PM

SEATTLE – More survivors of the 2006 shooting rampage at Seattle Jewish Federation took the stand Thursday at the second trial of Naveed Haq.
Prosecutors say Haq was angry over the U.S. and Israeli politics in the Middle East, and that's what led to the shooting that killed one woman and wounded five people.
Haq's attorneys say he is a mentally ill man who suffers from hallucinations. He has pleaded not guilty by reason of insanity.
On July 28, 2006, Haq barged into the Jewish Federation with an arsenal of guns. Surveillance video shows Haq running after Pamela Waechter, who was shot and killed.
One of the five wounded was Carol Goldman, who testified Thursday.
"I kept thinking to myself this can't be happening. This is so surreal. I can't believe what's going on around me" said Goldman.
Bleeding from wounds to her knee and arm, Goldman hid and called 911.
"Had me kind of switch immediately to survival mode and get out of harms way and thus, I got underneath my desk to try to get out of any immediate danger the best I could," said Goldman.
It still doesn't make sense to Layla Bush, who had to walk into court Thursday with the aid of a cane after being shot by Haq.
"As I was turning around, I was shot in the side. I fell down because the bullet fractured my vertebrae and made my legs totally die, essentially." said Bush.
Just days after being arrested, Haq made a series of phone calls to his parents. Prosecutors contend the calls demonstrate Haq was thinking clearly when he opened fire.
"Haq went on to say, 'I don't feel bad about what. I did it. I don't need to ask for forgiveness.  I did the right thing,'" said deputy prosecutor Don Kaz.
Haq's defense attorneys fought to keep the tapes away from the jury. His attorney, John Carpenter, says it demonstrates Haq's mental illness, which prevents him from knowing right from wrong.
"When that person is in a manic phase, they make decisions that do not make sense," said Carpenter.
A mistrial was declared in the first trial after jurors deadlocked on all but one of the 15 charges.
If convicted, Haq faces life in prison.
 

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