Utah avalanche-control worker killed in slide

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Associated Press

Posted on April 12, 2013 at 9:33 AM

Updated Friday, Apr 12 at 11:34 AM

SALT LAKE CITY (AP) — Authorities were traveling Friday to a fatal avalanche involving a backcountry professional who deployed a special air bag but didn't survive a snow slide in the Wasatch mountains east of Salt Lake City.

Craig Patterson of Park City was a veteran backcountry skier for the Utah Department of Transportation since 2006. He was working alone Thursday and scouting terrain for avalanche danger in Big Cottonwood Canyon.

Officials at the Utah Avalanche Center joined the investigation under 10,403-foot Kessler Peak, near the apex of Big and Little Cottonwood canyons, home to four of Utah's ski resorts.

Patterson, 34, was among eight backcountry professionals for UDOT who climb mountains on skis and drop explosives to set off avalanches, usually early in the morning before ski resorts open. They work round-the-clock shifts to keep avalanches from crossing state roads in the canyons and endangering motorists.

"It's a big responsibility," UDOT spokesman Adam Carrillo said Friday. "They don't take it lightly, and a lot of times they end up going out on their own because there's a lot of terrain to cover."

Patterson's body was recovered just before 1 a.m. Friday.

"He was able to deploy his air bag," Carrillo said. "He did everything he needed to do."

Air bags for skiers, often built into backpacks, are fairly new technology. They were first developed in Europe, where a Swiss avalanche institute says they have saved hundreds of lives. There were introduced in the Rocky Mountains a few years ago at prices from $600 to more than $1,000.

The air bags are designed to keep skiers afloat in an avalanche, but skiers can still be dragged over rocks or into trees. Details of Patterson's accident weren't immediately known.

UDOT has never lost an avalanche forecaster before, Carrillo said.

The agency is evaluating whether it should require the backcountry avalanche-control workers to work in pairs so one can dig the other out from any slide, he said.

"This is a one-of-a-kind incident," he said. "It's strategic loss to our family."

Utah Gov. Gary Herbert said Patterson was a "dedicated state employee who was admired and respected for his professionalism and expertise in making our canyons safer for countless Utahns."

Herbert said Patterson leaves a wife and daughter and "will be dearly missed."

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