New device acts as artificial pancreas

The Mini-med 670-G will change the lives of patients by combining the glucose monitor and insulin pump in one device.

The MiniMed 670G, or as some call it, the new artificial pancreas, will dramatically change the lives of people with diabetes.

Many people with diabetes wear a sensor which senses the glucose, or sugar, in their systems, and a pump to deliver insulin. However,  the patient still has to do all the calculations as to how much insulin is needed.

Others live by sticking their fingers several times a day.

Dr. John Cavanaugh, an endocrinologist, says the newly approved device will change the lives of patients by combining the glucose monitor and insulin pump into one device.

"This next step is going to automatically do that for them. As far as the basal infusion goes, that's the insulin that is delivered all the time," Dr. Cavanaugh said.

A lot of people with diabetes end up hospitalized because their blood sugars get seriously low or high. Dr. Cavanaugh says nighttime can be especially dangerous.

"Some people don't feel the low blood sugar coming on and so they don't wake up until things are pretty desperate," Dr. Cavanaugh said.

It’s believed this new artificial pancreas will be a life-changer for the roughly 1.2 million people in the U.S. living with type one diabetes, who will no longer have to continuously monitor their blood sugar levels.

This dream will likely be fulfilled when the MiniMed 670G hits the market in 2017.

KING


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