Talkin' Tech: MiKandi for smartphone sex apps, HTC Imagio review

Talkin' Tech: MiKandi for smartphone sex apps, HTC Imagio review

Credit: NWCN

Talkin' Tech: MiKandi for smartphone sex apps, HTC Imagio review

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by Renay San Miguel/Northwest Cable News

NWCN.com

Posted on December 7, 2009 at 11:18 AM

Updated Thursday, Jan 21 at 9:39 AM

No matter what the technology platform, adult content - porn, if you prefer - will find a way to match up with whatever consumer electronics devices are being used by the masses in any given decade. VCR's brought about the death of adult theaters, CD-ROM's and then DVD's signaled the end of videotapes.

Then the Internet came along, and the desire for adult content online actually helped pioneer such things we take for granted now such as streaming video, webcams and credit card authentication.

It stands to reason that smartphones and the explosion in applications would be the next frontier for porn. At least, that's the hopes of those who are behind the Seattle-based MiKandi, which recently opened a developer's portal and hopes to launch its consumer-oriented website later in December.

There's certainly nothing standing between you and pics/videos that might be found in so-called "lad mags" like Maxim. Nudity may also be found for download to phones, but those apps are few, far-between and not as easy to find as, say, Urbanspoon or Google Maps. But Jennifer McEwen and her co-founders at MiKandi hope to change that.

McEwen told me that her company hopes to lure two types of customers: consumers who are searching for R, NC-17 and XXX-rated content on smartphones and filling up Google searches in their quest for such apps, and application developers who have been stymied so far by the likes of Apple and other phone-operating-system companies with restrictions on content. McEwen promises that MiKandi won't censor ideas for apps - as long as they are legal, she stressed.

MiKandi will provide the platform for developers to write apps for the open-source Android operating system from Google. Because Google and the companies that make Android-based phones all belong to the Open Handset Alliance, McEwen believes they won't restrict the content. MiKandi's developer platform will provide the software development kits, the marketing and a payment system for the app writers. And the consumer website will let users download the apps without having to use the Android Marketplace or other official "app stores."

Fall DEMO 2009

Six finalists get a chance to wow an audience of entrepreneurs and investors this week during the Northwest Start DEMO Fall 2009 event at Union Square in Seattle.

The six finalists, who have survived a "rigorous screening process," in the words of event co-organizer Steven Johnson are Aquapulser Engineering, Basic Athletic Measurement, Exponential Entertainment, Limeade, Pharaoh Software and Zooppa.

For the first time, DEMO will include the participation of all the major tech angel investment organizations in the Puget Sound region, including Alliance of Angels, Keiretsu Forum, Puget Sound Venture Club, Seraph Capital Forum, Tacoma Angel Network and Zino Society. A winner will be chosen by the end of the evening, which gets underway at 5:30 p.m.

Lego Rock Band/Band Hero reviews

Music-based video games have already started targeting certain demographics or musical styles/tastes - witness Guitar Hero/Aerosmith and Beatles Rock Band, versions that skew a tad older, shall we say, than what's being played on Top 40 radio.

Lego Rock Band and Band Hero hope to correct the musical imbalance by focusing on more recent music that's more kid friendly, according to our resident gaming addict, Tracy Gorgas.

 

 

HTC Imagio review

The smartphone of the week on Talkin' Tech - the HTC Imagio. It's Verizon's first smartphone to feature Windows Mobile 6.5 OS (now called Windows Phone).

Microsoft is allowing handset manufacturers to do a little more tinkering and customization with its software, so navigating the Imagio offers a little more HTC Sense user interface blended with the Windows Phones OS. Which is a good thing, if you've ever tried a previous Windows Mobile phone.

The big selling point for the Imagio, though, won't likely be its software, but its video capabilities. It features Verizon's VCast Mobile TV - live TV on your smartphone. True, it's only a handful of channels, it will add $13-15 extra to your monthly bill and not all markets have coverage. But it is live TV, including channels like Fox, CBNC and CBS and there's also video on demand. And the antenna doubles as a kickstand, so you can prop up the phone horizontally and keep up with news while working at your desk. Just don't let the boss catch you.

The Imagio cost $199 after a $100 rebate. That also gets you a five megapixel camera, Bing search, access to the still-fledgling Windows Marketplace for apps and a nice sleek design.

 

 

Both would meet with parental approval, Tracy says. There are no dicey lyrics here and the music spans everything from Elton John to Cold War Kids.

The gameplay is pretty much the same as the more grown-up versions of either game. Tracy says both games are fun but he gives the slight edge to Lego Rock Band. I mean, come on...it's Legos!

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